Moving forward on Motiño

UPDATED: all recipe redactions here.

I spent all winter careening from one Big Looming Deadline to the next, and now that Kingdom A&S is less than a week away and I’m wrapping up the loose ends on my last big deadline, I’m thinking about where to go from here.

I’ve never managed to do a proper feast writeup. I pour every bit of everything I have into the event itself, and when it’s over, I’m exhausted, but I take a couple of days to recover and then turn around and plunge into KA&S (usually seven weeks later; this year, four) and by the time that’s over I just don’t even want to look at the material again. And I don’t.

But documentation is half the work, and I don’t want to lose sight of the bigger picture, or momentum on the bigger project: the Motiño translation. I’ve added skeleton pages for both the translation and backlogged feast writeups. I’m going to devote one evening a week over the next few months to working on these content areas and on Baltic Costume Reference Pages.

As a teaser, a new recipe, not presented in the feast but will be presented at Outlands Kingdom Arts and Sciences in the Shire of Aarquelle this coming Saturday.

Un pastel de Membrillos. 219 [pp 470-472]

 TOMARAS dos libras de acucar, y haras almibar dello: luego haras dozena y media de huevos hilados en esse almibar: luego echaras ocho, o diez membrillos sobre el almibar, y echarle has agua demanera que se cobra, y echarle has unas rajas de calena detro, y dos pares de clavos enteros, y un poco de vino: luego ponlo a cozer todo poco a poco, que se vayan conservádo los membrillos, y tapalos con una cobertera, y de quando en quando dales una buelta con el caco: y quando dales una buelta con el caco: y quando esten bien conservados, y con buena color, sacar los has del almibar que se enfrié: luego haras un pastelon de masa blanca, y meteras membrillos détro: luego meteras los huevos mexidos entre membrillos y membrillos, y dentro dellos porque se han de sonservar enteros y luego cierra tu pastel: y en estando cozida la masa abre el paste, y hinchelo de almibar, y metelo en el horno assi deftapado para que los huevos se tuesten un poco y tomen una colorcilla dorada. Y advierte, que se fuere dia de carne le podras echar una caña de vaca hecha trocos: y si no le quieres echar huevos mexidos con sola la caña de vaca que le eches, y unas yemas de huevos duras parecere bien: y a estos pastels que no lleván huevos mexidos, has de echar unas revanadas de pan blanco tostadas entre membrillo y mebrillo: y despues de lleno el pastel con el almibar parece muy bien.

Quince Pastry.

Take two pounds of sugar, and make syrup of it: then add a dozen and a half beaten eggs into this syrup: then cast them eight or ten quinces on the syrup, and pour you water so charged, and pour you some cracks of cinnamon, and two pairs of whole cloves, and a little wine: then put it to cook everything slowly, that will be preserved quinces; cover with a lid, and occasionally give them a stir with dipper: and when you give them a stir with dipper: and when they are well preserved, with good color, you take out the syrup to cool: then make white pie dough, shall put the quinces inside: then shalt pour the mixed eggs between quince and quince, and within because they have to retain whole and then shut your pie: and being cooked dough opens the cake, and swelling of syrup, and place it in the oven uncovered until the eggs are toasted a bit and take a golden little color. He warns that on a meat day you can take whatever bone can be made​​ [into gelatin]: and if you do not want to mix the gelatin into the eggs, the hardened [custarded] eggs will be good: and if these pastries are not to carry scrambled eggs [if you want to make an eggless pastry], you have to [instead] add a few slices of white bread toast between layers of quince: and then fill the pastry with the syrup and it will be fine.

Version 1

  • 2 lb. sugar
  • 2 c. water
  • 2 c. sweet white wine
  • 4 lb. quinces, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced
  • 8 eggs
  • 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 lb. pie crust of choice (I used Ruhlman’s 3-2-1 Pastry Crust out of Ratio)

Combine sugar, water, wine, and quinces and cook down until quinces are thoroughly cooked (soft, and begin to take on a rusty color). Separate quinces and spices from syrup using a slotted spoon. Temper syrup into eggs; return to saucepan and cook until well thickened. Return quinces to filling, removing spices. Fill prepared pie crusts and bake 20-25 minutes at 400°, until crust is golden and filling is solid. COOL THOROUGHLY before slicing.

Version 2

  • 2 lb. sugar
  • 2 c. sweet white wine
  • 4 lb. quinces, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced
  • 1 packet gelatin, prepared in 2 c. water
  • 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 lb. pie crust of choice (I used Ruhlman’s 3-2-1 Pastry Crust out of Ratio)

Combine sugar, wine, lemon juice, and quinces and cook down until quinces are almost cooked. Add gelatin and cook down  until quinces are thoroughly cooked (soft, and begin to take on a rusty color) and mixture is well thickened. Remove spices. Fill prepared pie crusts and bake 25-30 minutes at 350°, until crust is golden. COOL THOROUGHLY before slicing.

Version 3

  • 2 lb. sugar
  • 2 c. water
  • 2 c. sweet white wine
  • 4 lb. quinces, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced
  • fine white bread, sliced very thin (I used Basic Boulé out of Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes A Day.)
  • 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 lb. pie crust of choice (I used Ruhlman’s 3-2-1 Pastry Crust out of Ratio)

Combine sugar, water, wine, lemon juice, and quinces and cook down until quinces are thoroughly cooked (soft, and begin to take on a rusty color). Layer bread and quinces into prepared pie crusts using a slotted spoon, beginning and ending with quince; or, layer bread and quinces into a well-buttered dish, beginning with bread and ending with quince. Pour syrup over all and allow to settle for a few minutes. Bake 30-35 minutes at 350° , until crust is golden and filling is solid. COOL THOROUGHLY before slicing.

updated: Because I was not able to source as much quince as I thought I would, I was only able to take the custard version to Kingdom A&S. I think quince is gone for the year, but I’m sure I can find an excuse over next winter’s feast season to show up at potlucks and such with the gelatin and costrada versions!

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2 Comments

Filed under artsci competition, Food

2 responses to “Moving forward on Motiño

  1. Why that pie crust recipe? Is there any description of pie crust flavor or texture that leads you to choose that pie crust recipe?

    What kind of cinnamon?

    I want to try the one with gelatin! I bet that’s delicious! It’s like a pie filled with quince turkish delight. Mmmmmmm…

    • There’s actually not, either in this recipe or in others that I’ve worked on (and this manuscript is FULL of pastries; there are almost 80 empanadas, artaletes, and pasteles – I’d hoped that somewhere he would talk a little in detail about pastry crust, but if he does, I haven’t found it yet). I used the Ratio recipe because it’s clean and fundamental. I’m still chewing on the conversation I had with Kristoff about internalizing fundamental principles, and when there’s a conceptual gap in a manuscript I tend to assume that it’s because the writer is assuming that the reader obviously knows how to do that thing, so I just forge forward and do that thing, in the most simple, fundamental, efficient way I know.

      I used the cinnamon we bought at that Mexican grocery in Denver, and it was fabulous.

      The gelatin one doesn’t set up quite that firmly – it’s actually got a glossy texture similar to commercial tinned apple pie filling. The custard one is my favorite – of course. Because custard!

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